Outdoor Archery

Range Layout

Outdoor target archery is shot on a level field. The range should ideally face North or South to prevent the sun blinding archers, particularly in the early mornings and late afternoons. Targets can be placed from 10m to 90m depending on the Rounds (the name of the shoot, e.g. a FITA 90m). The range should have no less than a 50m safety zone behind the 90m target. The gap between targets should be no less 3m and a maximum of 4 archers per target 36. Range layout specifications for National and Olympics events are more specific.

The shooting line requires the archer to be directly over it, as such, most archers straddle the line with their feet. Both feet do not need to be behind the line when shooting 37. A waiting line is 5m behind the shooting line 38 and behind that is an equipment line. All these lines permit ease of movement for archers, provide clear observation for Judges and the Director of Shooting and are essential for safety. Spotting scopes should be set up and left on the shooting line. The highest point of the spotting scope should not be higher than the archer's armpit 39.

Targets

The paper targets are FITA 122cm (also referred to as a Large Face) and 80cm (also referred to as Small Face) 40. These are secured with target pins or staples to the target butt. The target butt stops your arrow. The target butt is held up off the ground by a target stand. Your target number is displayed below the actual target. Make sure you aim at the right target before you release. Above the target is a flag to alert you to wind conditions. Most ranges also have a windsock.

FITA Outdoor Target

Rounds

Rounds are either 144 arrows, 90 arrows or 72 arrows. Tournament rounds are generally 144 arrow FITA 90m, FITA 70m, Intermediate and Horsham 41. Breaks are provided every 36 arrows during tournaments as targets are moved to new distances. Remember to re-focus your spotting scope and change your sight settings at the beginning of breaks. This avoids having to do this when shooting re-commences.

Arrows

Our archers generally use the thinnest and shortest that can be safely shot, adhering to the manufacturer's arrow chart specifications. Tips are target tips generally ranging in weights from 100g to 120g. The 120g tip is generally used by our archers that shoot 90m. Fletches are usually the smallest possible, less the 2 inches. The arrow set up is therefore goaled at punching through cross winds.

Archery Coaching

Lake Joondalup Archery Club wishes to thank Ken Birch for the coaching he provided at this session. He works tirelessly and with enthusiasm to develop Western Australian archers, and has done so for many years.

Indoor Archery

Range Layout

Shooting line setup is similar to outdoor target in that the archer's feet straddle the shooting line 42. The Waiting line is no less than 3m behind the shooting line 43. Scopes are permitted provided there is sufficient room. If there is insufficient space, the organizers have the right to stop the use of scopes on the shooting line 44. The venue generally has a polished wooden floor or a concrete floor. Lighting is often fluorescent.

Targets

A single face 40cm FITA 10 ring can be selected if the archer chooses to shoot all three arrows at the same target 45. The advantage with these targets is that if shooting a score of 5 or less, then that score is not lost. The disadvantages are, if you are an accurate shooter, arrow damage and the risk of deflection into a lower scoring ring. The other option offered is a set of three 5 ring targets, either in a vertical or triangular configuration 46. Only one arrow is shot at each of the three targets. As the lowest scoring ring is a 6, anything outside of that is recorded as a miss. The advantage is there is no chance of arrow damage and deflection (unless shooting on the wrong target). If two arrows are put onto an individual vertical or triangular then the highest scoring arrow is scored as a miss. For compounds, only the inner ten ring (also referred to as the X ring) counts as a 10. The rest of the 10 ring is scored as a 9 46. For other bow types, target rings are scored as per normal.

FITA Indoor Single Target FITA Indoor Vertical Target FITA Indoor Triangular Target

Rounds

We currently shoot FITA 18m Indoor 60 arrow events, at a club, State, National and International level. 25m events are also available.

Arrows

Many indoor archers use the thickest possible arrows, to gain a point advantage on line breakers. Obviously, the thicker the arrow the more chance it has of breaking the line. If the archer is consistently highly accurate and capable of shooting on vertical or triangular sets of faces then the thicker arrow is a viable option. The arrow head must not exceed 9.4mm and the shaft 9.3mm 47. Many top archers select a Single face and shoot with their existing arrows. If the thicker arrow is selected, it would be reasonable to assume that the arrow rest height, or nocking point would also require adjustment to compensate for the thicker arrow shaft if using one bow for all disciplines.

Three arrow ends are shot. The archer has two minutes to shoot each end. There is generally a 30 seconds left warning signal.

Field Archery

Range Layout

The range layout is much like a golf course, with target numbers in black and yellow positioned just before the archer reaches their designated shooting peg. Ground may be uneven, with archers required to shoot uphill, down hill and to level. As such, the course usually takes maximum advantage of the terrain. A system of coloured pegs, or flags, is used to indicate the shooting line for the archer's division. Red is furthest away from the target, blue mid and yellow closest. On a marked FITA, all pegs have the distance to target marked 48. The archer's feet must be behind the peg when shooting. For a Field course, groups based on the colour peg they shoot from are often assigned to shoot together. The groups are normally limited to 4 with 2 archers shooting together from either side of their assigned peg 49. On completion of shooting a particular target, the shooting group move onto the next target. A two minute for 3 arrows time limit applies. Whilst this is can be difficult for organizers to monitor, archers should adhere to the two minute time limit out of courtesy, so that they do not hold up the entire course 50.

Targets

Targets are 6 ring black faces with a yellow centre. The centre yellow ring is scored as a 6 going down to the outer black ring that is scored as a 1 51. Targets also range in size. 20cm faces for the shorter distances, 40cm and 60cm for mid distances and 80cm for the longest distances. Targets must be no less than 15cm above ground, or vegetation. The table below sets out distance/targets for a marked FITA Field 52:

Number of targets Diameter Yellow Peg Blue Peg Red Peg
3 Ø 20cm 5m – 10m – 15m 5m - 10m - 15m 10m - 15m - 20m
3 Ø 40cm 10m – 15m – 20m 15m - 20m - 25m 20m - 25m - 30m
3 Ø 60cm 20m – 25m – 30m 30m - 35m - 40m 35m - 40m - 45m
3 Ø 80cm 30m – 35m - 40m 40m - 45m - 50m 50m - 55m - 60m

FITA Field Targets

Rounds

We usually compete in 24 target marked Field rounds, that are 72 arrow events with 3 arrow ends. There are other rounds, including 12 target rounds and 24 target unmarked rounds.

Arrows

Standard arrows are suitable with either target or field tips. Use brightly coloured fletches so that missed arrows that end up in the undergrowth are not lost. In Western Australia, during spring, flowers are often yellow and pink. Using yellow or pink fletches can make finding missed arrows, in such an environment, quite challenging.

Clout Archery

Range Layout

Archers shoot distances of 100m to 180m, depending on their division. The division shooting lines must be separated by 10m laterally, so that archers don't shoot over the heads of any other division. The shooters shoot towards a clout, a triangular flag or penetratable board (the target). No more than 20 archers may shoot at a clout. An equipment line is 5m behind the shooting line 53. Archers straddle the shooting line with their feet 54.

Clout Archery Range

This photo is of Archery Western Australia's range with clout range set up (as an example). Range layouts differ depending on the number of competitors. This diagram is not drawn to scale.

Targets

The clout is positioned centrally in a circlular ground target with a 15m diameter. The target must be flat soft turf. The target is a ten ring target with 75cm rings that are determined with a marked rope that is attached with a ring to the post of the clout. The rope is pulled around the circumference of the target when scoring. Small coloured flags mark the outer colour zones of the target, both to the left and right of the clout 55. An arrow that penetrates the clout is scored as a 10. The ground target is scored per the normal ten ring scoring system, the inner yellow as 10, to the outer white a 1. When scoring, the rope is pulled around the clout and arrows withdrawn from the ground and placed in piles per the ring they have been scored as. The point in the ground where the arrow is first visible is used for scoring purposes. For example, piles of 10's, 9's etc. Any arrow outside the 1 ring is scored as a miss. Archers then identify their arrows and call out their scores in descending order 56.

Clout Archery

Rounds

A Clout Archery Round comprises six (6) ends of six (6) arrows (36 arrows) 57.

Arrows

Standard arrows are suitable, with a heavy tip (e.g. 120g) recommended.

Clout Sights

As the archer has to elevate the angle of aim well above settings used for outdoor, indoor and field archery sight settings, special settings or sights are normally required for clout archery. As clout is not a common discipline, manufacturers of clout sights are rare, and archery retailers generally don't stock clout sights. Serious competitors use mirrors or prism attachments so that they can see the clout. Others use points of aim on the ground, strips of tape on the lower limbs, pins in the bow handle and a variety of other attachments 58.

Clout Sight

This clout sight is manufactured by Archery Equipment WA. It is a set of mirrors set up like a periscope. The angle of the top mirror can be adjusted with the top wing nut. Shown mounted on a Cartel sight bar, that allows for additional up/down/left/right adjustment.

Clout training

Clout training

Lake Joondalup Archery Club wishes to thank Robin Briggs (of Sorrento Archery Club) for the coaching he provided at this session. He emphasised the importance of scoring well in clout, particularly when it is included in a multi-discipline event such as the Nationals. Gavin and Mark also had a lot of fun. Many thanks to Sue Gliddon, Archery Western Australia's Development Officer, for organizing the training session.

Robin Briggs has published the following articles on the subject of clout that are well worth reading:

Flight Archery

Range Layout

The goal of a flight shoot is to shoot six arrows as far as possible. The range is 200m wide with distance lines marked every 100m. The shooting line is 20m. The range should be devoid of trees and flat. The minimum distance is 100m. The range must have a safety margin of 100m beyond the expected furthest distance. To achieve Grand Master Bowman a distance of 430m is required. The record for a compound is 1,207.39m by Kevin Strother on July 31, 1992. Some clubs in the USA use dried salt lakes for a range.

Targets

The furthest distance possible.

Rounds

A round consists of six (6) arrows.

Arrows

Special flight arrows can be purchased if partcipating at a competitive level. Otherwise, use standard arrows with small fletches and light tips (e.g. 80g - 100g). Each arrow must be plainly marked with the name of the archer, the bow weight class in which it is to be used, and numbered. An arrow cannot be used more than once in any event. The minimum arrow length is 356mm.

Archer's Equipment

Compound archers must use a recurve release. The recognised bow draw weight classes are:

Men & Junior Men: Unlimited, up to 40 kg, up to 33 kg and up to 25 kg.

Women & Junior Women: Unlimited, up to 25kg and up to 18 kg.

Intermediate and Cubs: Up to 25kg and up to 18 kg

Click here to go to References and Acknowledgements